BookEnds Literary Agency I Am No Longer Busy
BookEnds Literary Agency Shut it Down & Get to Work
BookEnds Literary Agency What Is Your Story?
BookEnds Literary Agency Praise for Rosemary Simpson!
BookEnds Literary Agency The Negative Power of Words

Jessica Faust’s #BucketList

I never thought of a bucket list as something I’d do, although I guess we all have one even if it’s not written down. When Kim came up with the idea for all of us to do bucket list posts I thought it was great and would be a ton of fun. I was right. In preparing my list I discovered all sorts of amazing things I’d like to do.

1. Represent that novel or writer that everyone wants to be the “next” of. I want to have the client who is mentioned in all the queries as the comparison book that everyone is looking for, and the name that comes up again and again when editors are giving agents a wish list. And heck, maybe I do, but we just don’t know it yet.

2. Sleep in the Ice Hotel in Sweden and see the Northern Lights, preferably in Sweden.

3. Own a tiny library. Right now my location isn’t ideal for such a thing, but I’d love to have one built and set up near the imaginary sidewalk in front of my house.

4. Reread Little Women–preferably all day, in front of fire, in cozy pajamas while drinking coffee and hot chocolate and eating popcorn and cookies. While I’m at it add Pride and Prejudice to that list.

5. Take an overnight train trip (preferably multiple nights) in a sleeper car. In my wildest dreams it’s across great landscapes with gorgeous views. Maybe in the Western US or Canada. Do they have long train rides to Alaska? I’ve always thought of trains as horribly romantic and the idea of being nestled in my car and eating in a dining car seems so wonderful and dreamy. Of course I’d have a stack of books.

6. Make a difference in someone’s life. One day I would like to think that I’d been someone’s mentor and that my words made a difference for them.

7. Own a home on a lake with a lending library. I’d love to have a lake house with gorgeous views and lots of guest rooms. When friends and family come to visit they would help themselves to the wall of bookshelves and discover new worlds. Maybe they’d take the book home with them and leave one behind.

8. Pay a stranger’s bill. Not just any stranger, but the harried mom at the next table who is overwhelmed with family and life (every mom has been there). Without her ever knowing I’d like to pay her bill and tip the waiter mightily (ideally the same as the bill).

9. In fact, tip a waiter far more than the bill ever was. Once, in another life, I waited tables. It happened to be my last night at that particular job and a man came up to me and asked to buy a bottle of champagne for the table I was waiting on. The bottle cost $50. He handed me $100 and told me to keep the change. I’ll never forget that and I would so love to do that for another hard-working and kind waiter.

10. Spend the summer driving around the United States in an RV. Parking at random campgrounds, visiting oddities like balls of twine or giant frying pans, s’mores at night and locally owned diners during the day.

Category: Blog

Tags:

9 comments

  1. Loved both of your lists! Your last item reminds me of one of my own. I live in NJ and I would really like to spend a weekend driving the perimeter of the state. I would start at High Point and drive east and down along the coast, then after hitting Cape May Point, I would swing back up north via the Delaware. Not sure where I would stay each night. Maybe Cape May and Frenchtown. Leave my husband and kids home for the weekend, grab a girlfriend or two and just take off.

  2. As 2Ns said, you’ve already achieved #6.

    Following from yesterday’s post, on the basis a bucket list has to be something you have control over (meaning ‘being traditionally published can’t really sit in #1 spot), my alternate #1 would be design and build my own house (preferably in a rural setting). The Hub and I have renovated 2 houses, one on a massive scale, but I want to start from scratch. In anticipation of this maybe one day happening I am always designing floor plans and making notes of cool ideas.

    I’ve kinda done your #10. When I was 20 I traveled to the US and backpacked my way around the country sleeping in a tent (with just occasional stops in a city hotel). I did that for nearly 3 months so saw heaps and had the most amazing time.

    You can do #5 in Australia (it’s 3 nights) . The Indian Pacific travels between the east and west coasts of Australia, so you go through a big variety of ecosystems, including the outback (you could swing a trip by coming to an RWAus conference *grin*).

      1. Didn’t cross my mind (and I’m sure it didn’t cross 2Ns either). But I think this is an interesting point, because “making a difference” to someone’s life is a special thing to do, and I’m sure many people would be delighted to know they had made a difference to someone – but it is rare you actually find out you have. Often the only way you find out is if said person one day lets you know, but I don’t think that happens often.

        I think the other thing to acknowledge is that sometimes what you do may seem so small to you, but can make such a big difference to another person. You can read some examples here of small acts of kindess (but be careful because they may make your eyes water).

        In the case of your post I think it is more you made it something for us to consciously think about and provided an opportunity to give that acknowledgement.

  3. I don’t know about Alaska, but the Empire Builder travels between Seattle and Chicago. My son and I rode it from Seattle to the Twin Cities, with a stop for a few days in Glacier National Park, when he was about 4 (peak train obsessiveness age in little boys). It was a wonderful experience. the biggest surprise of which was how beautiful North Dakota is in June. Anytime I find someone talking about planning a train trip, I recommend the Empire Builder.

  4. I think you can cross off #6. After 20 years on my own trying to get a NY publisher interested in one of my books, you got me my first NY contract, which has led to a really satisfying career doing what I love. That phone call from you (I was in my car in the Safeway parking lot in Healdsburg…) made an unimaginable difference in my life, and your advice and patience during my occasional meltdowns over the years has kept me moderately sane throughout. (You notice I don’t ask what it’s done for you…)

    Thank you for all you do!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *