Welcome to BookEnds, SE Witschorke!

Fair Warning: when you read S.E.’s book, you will find yourself craving fried food. Lots of it. And from the moment I started reading the manuscript and craved fried pickles, I knew her writing was special. She’s been a joy to work with and I cannot wait for y’all to meet this amazingly talented woman!

 

Tell us a bit about your writing process. Where do you write, and how often?

Writing on my couch is my favorite place, but I also use my kitchen table even though I have a perfectly suitable study with a desk and chair.  My preference for a nontraditional arrangement harkens back to doing homework in front of the TV on the couch. I graduated salutatorian of my class so I think the bad habit actually benefited me. I write at least once a day, but I prefer to have two sessions—afternoon and late night.

 

If you’re not reading or writing, what would we catch you doing? 

I have many interests I indulge in—dining out, cooking new recipes, playing the piano, binge-watching Netflix shows, or catching a Yankees game.

 

 

What’s the last book you read?

I am a diversified reader, meaning I don’t just read in the genre and age category I write for. I just finished reading Kids of Appetite by David Arnold and The Memory of Lemon by Judith Fertig simultaneously while vacationing in California.

 

If money were no object, what would be your dream writing location?

To keep myself focused on my writing goals, I created a vision board centered on everything that led to becoming an author and envisioning what I hope to accomplish once I’m a published author. One section is dedicated to my dream writing location. Some day I’d love to own a cottage in Cape Cod so that I can write with a view of the beach, and when I’m stuck I can go for a long walk or take a dip in the ocean.

 

 

What advice would you give to other authors in the query trenches?

  1. Believe in yourself-you’ll get rejections, this business is very subjective, but don’t give up on you. The right agent or editor is out there. It might take six books or one hundred seventy-two rejections, but you WILL find the perfect match at the perfect time. The worst thing is to give up. The world needs the book only you can write.
  2. Wallowing in misery is okay-When the rejection comes from an agent or editor, some might smart more than others, indulge in your disappointment by yourself, with your family, or CPs, but then push it aside and keep calm and query on.

 

Category: JuniorMorrisOur AuthorsYoung Adult

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